Cart 0 items: $0.00

At Elden SHIPPING IS INCLUDED (on case quantities, Continental USA).

Elden Selections

TOP
Type
Red Wine

Domaine Germain Pere et Fils Saint Romain 'Sous Le Chateau' 2018

Appellation
Saint Romain
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2018
Add To Cart
$48.00
 
SKU: EGER03R-18
Overview

This Saint Romain red is from perhaps the best-known vineyard in the appellation: Sous le Chateau’. And with one taste you will understand its justified reputation. Here’s a Pinot that is startlingly charming in its youth. Fresh, clean and delicious. Round, not a hint of green. Full, juicy fruit explodes with youthful acidity. What a mouthful. And then, there, behind all this immediate pleasure, comes a structure which tells you that you want to save a few bottles of this for the future. But that might be hard to do, given the way it’s drinking today.

Producer

DOMAINE GERMAIN PERE ET FILS

Saint Romain

The Domaine Germain Père et Fils began in 1955 with vineyards situated uniquely in Saint Romain. At the base of its cliff, Saint Romain is a picturesque village, and was one of the earliest settlements and sanctuaries of the vine in Gallo-Roman Burgundy.

Today the Domaine Germain covers more than 33 acres, with wines in Saint Romain, Pommard and Beaune. Arnaud Germain, grandson of Bernard Germain, the domain’s founder, joined his parents in 2009. The three of them together have developed both the vinicultural and the commercial side of their activities, with Germain wines winning awards in France and abroad.

Experience and modern techniques both in the vines and in the cellar combine to produce wines of excellent quality for reasonable prices. Their reasoned, curative approach to their vineyard work, manual weed control through plowing and green harvest to control yields are all key to this success.

Red wines are vinified in a traditional manner:

Harvesting by hand, manual sorting in the vineyard

Complete destemming

Vatting: pulp = aroma, pips = tannin, skin = colour

Maceration (12 to 16 days): extracting the aromas, colour and tannins

Cap-punching and pumping over: Blending the must

Alcoholic fermentation: the sugars turn into alcohol (action of the yeasts)

Devatting: pumping the juice

Transferring to barrels or vats: depending on the wine, the year, the wine we want to produce

Filtering

Bottling, washing, labelling, selling

For our white wines, the vinification steps are:

Harvesting by hand

The whole bunch is pressed

Vatting: for static clarification

Transferring to barrels or vats: depending on the wine, the year, the wine we want to produce

Blending

Tartaric stabilisation: chilling

Filtering

Bottling, washing, labelling, selling

WINES

WHITE

SAINT ROMAIN

ALIGOTE

CREMANT DE BOURGOGNE

REDS

SAINT ROMAIN

SAINT ROMAIN ‘SOUS LE CHATEAU’

SAINT ROMAIN ‘LA PERRIERE’

POMMARD

BEAUNE .MONTAGNE SAINT DESIRE’

BEAUNE 1er CRU ‘LES AIGROTS’

BEAUNE 1er CRU ‘LES MONTREVENOTS’

BOURGOGNE HAUTES COTES DE BEAUNE

BOURGOGNE ROSE

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2018 VINTAGE

There has been talk over the past year of the 2018 vintage in Burgundy being one of the greatest of all time.  Comparisons with the mythical 1947, and all that.  But let’s be careful and take a closer look.

We’ve tasted some marvelous wines, both white and red, and from all of the appellation levels.  Purity and concentration would be the key words across the board.

But lest we forget, 2018 was the hottest vintage in Burgundy since 2003.  And frankly, we were expecting wines like we got in 2003: flabby whites and Cote du Rhone-like reds.  But that did not happen.  And the secret to understanding 2018 Burgundy lies in understanding the difference between these two very hot years.

If you look at 2018 from start to finish, not only was it hot, it was dry: 50% less precipitation than the annual average over the past 30 years. However, if you were here in the early part of the year, you’ll certainly remember the rain. ​

After a very dry summer in 2017, winter 2017-18 was wet. It rained nearly every day through March and into April.  And the vine was slow to bud.

That all changed in the middle of April. Wet soil and higher temperatures brought on explosive growth in the vineyards that the vignerons had a tough time keeping up with.  In a week we went from bud burst to unfurled leaves.

The first flowers burst in mid-May. The crop set regularly with very little disruption, and summer settled in. The early wet conditions followed by April’s warmth saw the onset of mildew, but the fungus never stood a chance.

It was a hot and sunny summer. Some would say it was a heat wave and a drought. And we started to see signs of stress in vineyards in certain sectors. Things were better where there was a little rain.  But August was bone dry. In fact, there was no rain from June 15th to the end of October.

It was about this time that comparisons to 2015 cropped up. You could see ripeness rapidly approaching, and there was talk of harvest starting at the end of August.

The vines were incredibly healthy; no moisture means no threat from mildew or odium. No rot.  Good ripeness.  ​

And, for the first time since 2009….a normal yield! So, let the harvest begin!

And it did, in the last days of August.  What was most astonishing right from the start was that the perceived acidity levels seem OK.  Granted, there’s no malic acid, but the levels of tartaric acid seem to be compensating, and there is an over-all impression of balance. 

Also amazing was the amount of juice the crop produced.  Not only was the yield bigger than the past 10 years’ average, but the amount of juice set a record for Burgundy.  So there will be a lot of 2018 around.

And all this in a year that felt more like the south of Spain than Burgundy as we know it.  The only thing we can attribute the quality of 2018 to is the abundant winter rains, and the vine’s ability to go searching for water when it needs it.

Appellation

SAINT ROMAIN

COTE DE BEAUNE

Saint Romain stands at the foot of an impressive rock outcrop, with a magnificent view out over the Saone River valley and across the vineyards below. Because of this commanding position, there have been settlements on this spot since early pre-historic times. And so some of the earliest plantations of vines were in this protected narrow valley, just off-line from the main escarpment of the Côte d’Or to the west of Auxey-Duresses. Above and beyond the village are vineyards classified Hautes Côtes de Beaune. Appellation Saint Romain can be either white or red, and the grapes are the traditional Burgundian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Produced in the commune of Saint Romain, the appellation Saint Romain has no premiers or grands crus. However, many wines mention the name of the single-vineyard (climat) from which they originate.

Wines

There are several distinct soil zones in the valley leading up to the village of Saint Romain. Coming up the valley from Auxey-Duresses, vines on the left are apt to be Pinot Noir. On the right in a south-facing amphitheater, you find the majority of the village vineyards. And here there is a distinct difference in soil make up, with the hills flanking to the left being better for Chardonnay. Traditionally, Saint Romain was white, but producers have found parcels that work well for Pinot, so that today white accounts for about 55% of the production.

Chardonnay benefits from a rich vein of limestone here (calcaire actif) that gives Saint Romain whites a distinctive freshness in their minerality. Lemony notes are frequently lime tinted. And white floral notes are common.

Pinot Noir shows itself as ruby red in youth with red fruit notes of raspberry and cherry. These wines drink well young, especially in riper years, with forward fruit and spicy mineral notes. They have aging potential up to 10 years.

Terroirs

Notably higher (at between 350-410 meters) and cooler than the rest of the Cote d’Or, these vineyards have the potential to produce a style of Burgundy all their own. With a very interesting mix of geologic strata based on lias from the earliest Jurassic period, we get swirls of limestone and marl, notably calcaire actif that is particularly interesting for Chardonnay and produces a specific minerality completely different from other zones of white Burgundy production.

Color

Red wines - Pinot Noir

White wines - Chardonnay

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Reds: 39.22 ha

Whites: 57.03 ha

Food

The freshness in the minerality of Saint Romain white makes it a perfect aperitif wine. But it also lends itself to preparations similar to those you choose for Chablis. Escargot, goat cheese, shellfish in general and oysters in particular. Saint Romain reds can be elegant and velvety, but are often most appreciated for the lustiness of youth. Perfumed and spicy, it goes well with white meats and veal, and roasted birds.

Appellations

The following are village climats:

Au Bas de Poillange

Combe Bazin

En Chevrot

En Gollot

En Poillange

L'Argillat

La Croix Neuve

La Périère

Le Dos d'Ane

Le Jarron

Le Marsain

Le Village Bas

Le Village Haut

Sous la Velle

Sous le Château

Sous Roche

Continue Shopping
Sign up for inside offers, Burgundy News, and Special Promotions!