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Burgundy Wine Cellars

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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Albert Boillot Pommard 1er Cru 'En Largilliere' 2016

Domaine Albert Boillot Pommard 1er Cru 'En Largilliere' 2016

Appellation
Pommard
Region
Côte de Beaune
Vintage
2016
Add To Cart
$75.00
 
SKU: EBOT03R-16
Overview

Situated above the ‘Grands Epenots’, ‘En Largilliers’ is a relatively unknown premier cru. It sits between ‘Charmots’ and Pezerolles’, and just below ‘Noizons’, so it has pedigree! As its name implies, it has a high content of clay, meaning that produces deep, tight, earthy wines. The 2016 is expressive, with superlative round fruit that engulfs the palate, with just a touch of earth and smoke so you know it's a Pommard. Deep, long finish. A wine you can enjoy now, but which will reward any patience you might have.

Producer
Raymond Boillot of Volany is part of the greater Boillot and a cousin of the illustrious Henri Boillot of Domain Jean Boillot. He is a winemaker of some 40 harvests, and has a pedigree as an oenologist and ‘maitre de chai’ for the Reine Pedauque for most of his career. Situated in the communes of Volnay and Pommard, the Domaine Albert Boillot produces appellations Bourgogne White and red, Volnay and a Pommard 1er Cru. These vineyards total just under 10 acres, and produce on average 20,000 bottles a year. Raymond Boillot makes wine in the traditional manner, but with the benefits of modern oenolgical work. The wines are raised in French oak, of which 30% are less that 4 years old. The wines are therefore not marked by much new wood. The wine is sold at the property, directly to the consumer. Elden Selections are the first to import them into the US.
Vintage

BURGUNDY 2016 VINTAGE

If that first taste of the 2016 Burgundy vintage really grabs your attention, count yourself lucky.  Lucky in the same way that wine makers in Burgundy consider themselves lucky.

The excellent 2016 vintage was a nightmare for them, running a gamut of emotions from depression to despair, then out the other side towards hope and something resembling jubilation. It’s no exaggeration to say that 2016 took its toll on the collective psyche of the region.

After a very mild winter, April was frigid, with early hail in Macon and (yet again) Chablis.  Then, on the night of the 26th, a freak frost descended on much of the Cotes de Nuits and almost all of the Cote de Beaune.  I say ‘freak’ because it was a winter frost, not an April frost; meaning that it hit higher up the slopes than a spring frost would, touching vineyards that almost never freeze, notably Musigny and Montrachet.

It got worse. May was cool and depressingly wet, with storms when it wasn’t drizzling.  It’s then that the first corridors of mildew appeared. It hailed again in Chablis. The mood was like the weather: chilly and grey.  And it continued like this until the solstice, by which time the estimates were for an overall 50% crop loss across the region. It was hard to coax a smile from even the most seasoned winemakers.

Flowering took place in mid-June and was a bit protracted.  It forecast a late September harvest, 100 days away.  And given what had come before, the small crop looked incredibly vulnerable. 

But with the solstice came summer. A magnificent July and August, with heat enough to curb the mildew, brought exceptional conditions for grapes. Talk in the cellars turned from tales of woe to the benefits of low-yield vintages.

As always in Burgundy, September makes the wine. In 2016, the perfect amount of rain fell on September 14th, at the perfect time to counter the heat stress that the vines were starting to show.  And the fruit then ripened quickly in impeccable dry and sunny conditions.

What in mid-June seemed like a doomed crop was suddenly being touted as the equivalent of 2015, and maybe even better! Low yield years give intensity and concentration.  Cool vintages give good acidity and balance.  2016 was both.  Not a lot of fruit; but from serious ‘vignerons’,  what there was was beautiful.

The wines, both red and white, are fresh, chiseled, with balanced acidity and concentration.  The whites are definitely better than the 2015s, which lacked a touch of acidity. They are cool and energetic.  Maybe not to the level of the fabulous 14s, but there are many similarities.

As to the comparisons between 2015 and 2016, many commentators cite 1990 and 1991. Both 1990 and 2015 are considered among the finest red vintages in living memory.  And the vintages that followed them were both low-yield vintages that suffered early frost damage. Both 1990 and 2015 were hot years; both 1991 and 2016 were relatively cool. Both 1990 and 2015 were media darlings, and still are.  1991 got lost in the blare; maybe 2016 as well.  But both 1991 and 2016 are arguably much more typically Burgundian than their world-stage predecessors.  Classy and classic, ‘typical’ (in the best sense of the word), the greatest fault of the 2016 vintage could be its irregularity.

Appellation

POMMARD

COTE DE BEAUNE

Pommard lies between Beaune and Volnay where the Côte de Beaune makes a slight turn towards the Morvan. After Beaune, it is one of the larger vineyards. There are no grands crus, though there is a perennial debate about which of the best vineyards should be promoted. As in many of the best wine villages, the appellation is split by a combe with the village lying in the mouth of the valley. So here in Pommard, we speak of the north (Beaune) side vineyards and the south (Volnay) side vineyards. And that goes someway to explaining Pommard styles. But Pommard has a quirk: its best vineyards are not necessarily all situated on slopes. In fact many are in the flatland north of the village.

Produced only in the commune of Pommard, appellation Pommard includes 28 premiers crus.

Wines

Pommard has a reputation, forged in the 19th century, of being a massive beast of a wine. But look where it sits, between the south of Beaune and Volnay. Time, terroir and oenology have combined to show us a much more subtle Pommard, a wine that is richer and at the same time more elegant than its caricature. It can be deeply colored, and its berry fruit can be supported by cherry pit and plum. And yes it can develop wild aromas and chocolaty textures, but it will never be a tannic giant, but rather a full and gutsy, mouthwateringly rich, fruit-filled nugget.

Terroirs

On the lower slopes and flat ground, the soil is ancient alluvium. Mid-slope, the clay-limestone soils are well drained thanks to the inclusion of rock debris. Higher still are jurassic oxfordian marls, brown calcic soils, and brown limestone soils. In places, the soil is red with iron. Exposures are south or east, and altitudes range between 250 to 330 meters.

Color

Red wines only - Pinot Noir

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

321.69 ha (including 122.31 ha Premier Cru)

Food

Pommard's density is perhaps its most important feature when combining with food. Most will tell you that because it is so massive, it should be served with game. And is some cases this is correct. But you will find that braised and stewed meat and poultry work well, and the finesse of the wine can accent the rusticity of a simple stew. It is a natural partner for flavorful cheeses Époisses, Langres and Soumaintrain, but also Comté.

Appellations

On the label, the appellations 'Pommard' and 'Pommard 1er Cru' may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Clos Blanc

Clos de la Commaraine

Clos de Verger

Clos des Epeneaux

Derrière Saint-Jean

En Largillière

La Chanière

La Platière

La Refène

Le Clos Micot

Le Village

Les Arvelets

Les Bertins

Les Boucherottes

Les Chanlins-Bas

Les Chaponnières

Les Charmots

Les Combes Dessus

Les Croix Noires

Les Fremiers

Les Grands Epenots

Les Jarolières

Les Petits Epenots

Les Pézerolles

Les Poutures

Les Rugiens Bas

Les Rugiens Hauts

Les Saussilles

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, know as a lieu-dit:

Chaffaud

Clos Beauder

Derrière Saint-Jean

En Boeuf

En Brescul

En Chiveau

En Mareau

En Moigelot

La Chanière

La Combotte

La Croix Blanche

La Croix PlanetLa Levrière

La Plante aux Chèvres

La Vache

Le Bas des Saussilles

Le Poisot

Les Chanlins-Bas

Les Chanlins-Hauts

Les Combes Dessous

Les Cras

Les LambotsLes Noizons

Les Perrières

Les Petits Noizons

Les Riottes

Les Tavannes

Les Vaumuriens-Bas

Les Vaumuriens-Hauts

Les Vignots

Rue au Porc

Trois Follots

Village

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