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Domaine Marchand Freres Chambolle-Musigny ‘Vieilles Vignes’ 2022

Appellation
Bourgogne
Region
Cote du Nuits
Vintage
2022
In Stock
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$110.00
 
SKU: EMFR07R-22
Overview

The very politically-incorrect French describe Chambolle-Musigny as the most ‘feminine’ of the Corte de Nuits reds. It is violets, like in Volnay, but richer and more complex, perhaps. The term often used is ‘lacy’. The old vines give it character, personality even, and a structure solid enough to age.  But don’t miss the charm of youth either. 

Winemaker

DOMAINE MARCHAND FRERES

The Domaine Marchand Freres has been in existence since 1813 through seven generations, and for most of that time it was based in Morey-St. Denis. In 1983, however, the domain bought a winemaker’s house in the very center of Gevrey-Chambertin, ostensibly for the beautiful working cellars underneath. But Gevrey gradually became the seat of the business, and today Denis Marchand lives in the beautifully restored house and receives guests in the cellars below.

The domain has small parcels in some very important vineyards in Chambolle-Musigny, Morey-Saint-Denis and Gevrey-Chambertin, including premier cru ‘Les Sentiers’ in Chambolle, ‘Le Clos des Ormes’ in Morey and ‘Les Combottes’ in Gevrey. They also have holdings in Grand Cru Clos de la Roche, Griottes-Chambertin and Charmes Chambertin. But production is tiny, 1000 cases here, a few hundred there, mere dozens in the Grands Crus. Marchand Freres is the quintessential Burgundy domain: small production, high quality.

Vintage
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BURGUNDY 2022 VINTAGE

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After three successive high-quality but low-quantity vintages, winemakers in Burgundy are refilling their cellars with an excellent 2022 harvest.This is not to say that it was an easy ride. Once again, frost, heat and drought put stress on the growing season, but timing is everything, and the extreme weather did much less damage than in previous years.

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Winters have been wet and mild for years now. The winter of 2021-22 was not, with less than average rainfall and seasonal temperatures. Under these ‘normal’ conditions, we would expect budburst in the first half of April. But summer-like conditions at the end of March forced the vines, especially Chardonnay, to bud early, and we went into frost season with tender green buds exposed. There were two nights in the coming week below zero, but damage was limited.

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Spring conditions set in in mid-April, but Summer followed soon thereafter, dry with spiky heat waves. The vines went wild.  Winemakers fought to keep the growth under control. And the fight continued until flowering, which happened a couple of weeks early in mid-May.

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The warm, dry conditions led to nearly-perfect flowering. We saw for the first time the potential of a great crop, with lots of beautiful, full, well-formed grape bunches; and an early harvest, with fruit setting well ahead of schedule.

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But the drought held, and the fear was that this beautiful fruit would shrivel on the vine. Finally, at the end of June, the rain came. Summer storms bring with them the risk of hail, so all eyes were on the sky as the storms were sometimes violent causing significant but limited hail damage. The rains were intermittent, but regular for the next weeks. The cumulative rainfall would not be enough to see the crop through to harvest, however.

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The heat waves continued through the rains, and so the risk of fungal disease, usually associated with wet conditions, dried up. But temperatures spiked and dry conditions set in again. The grapes ripened in a full-blown heat wave. Winemakers had to keep a close eye on sugar levels, as the risk was that ripeness could gallop away at the last minute.

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And then, just about the time when it looked like an over-ripe mid-August harvest was imminent, it rained again. And the producers were able to let that water absorb into the fruit, increasing the volume of juice that was ultimately harvested in the first week of September.

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2022, both white and red, are showing real depth and ripeness. And while there was once again very little malic acid, the tartaric acid holds the balance and structure together. Early tastings in the barrel show enormous charm and vitality. Very promising.

Appellation

MOREY-SAINT DENIS

COTE DE NUITS

Rich in premiers crus and with 5 grands crus, the village should be a household name like its neighbors Gevrey-Chambertin and Chambolle-Musigny. In fact, Morey forms a bridge between these two appellations and shares some climat names. The grands crus form a contiguous band from north to south through the village. Yet despite the fact that Morey produces some of the most consistently excellent wines in Burgundy, fame eludes it outside of the circle of aficionados. This often means that these wines, especially the village and premier cru appellations, can be great value.

The appellation Morey-Saint Denis includes 20 premiers crus and 5 grands crus

Producing commune: Morey-Saint Denis.

Wine

Most of Morey-Saint Denis planted with Pinot Noir, although a few parcels of Chardonnay or Pinot Blanc produce a rare curious white, generally said to be firm and opulent. But Morey is known for its reds, bright ruby or intense garnet, depending on the year. The fruit is black: blackberry and blackcurrant with trademark black cherry fruit and pit. When older it is classic Burgundy Pinot, with animal notes, undergrowth, leather and truffle. Structure and balance are qualities found in all great wine, and Morey is a paradigm. Body, fruit, volume and length are part of the package that Morey climats offer to careful winemakers. The potential for greatness is part of the mystic of the appellation.

Terroirs

The vines grow on limestone and clay-limestone soils dating from the middle jurassic with white bathonien oolite higher on the slopes and fossiliferous bajocien limestone at the foot. The vineyards are east-facing at altitudes of 220-270 meters. Immediately below the village the slopes are differently oriented and the soil has more marl.

Color

Almost all reds - Pinot Noir

White wines - Chardonnay

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Reds : 93.03 ha (including 41.92 ha premier cru)

Whites : 3.37 ha (including 0.74 ha premier cru)

Food

The un-PC locals call the reds of Morey-Saint Denis 'masculine', as they are classic examples of full and powerful Cotes de Nuits. So dishes should also be strong and powerful to challenge the tannins and structure of the wine. Often game birds like pheasant are mentioned, as are roasted beef or veal.

On the label, the appellations 'Morey-Saint Denis' and 'Morey-Saint Denis' may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The names of the grands crus are the climats themselves:

Clos de Tart

Bonnes Mares

Clos de la Roche

Clos Saint-Denis

Clos des Lambrays

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Aux Charmes

Aux Cheseaux

Clos Baulet

Clos des Ormes

Clos Sorbè

Côte Rotie

La Bussière

La Riotte

Le Village

Les Blanchards

Les Chaffots

Les Charrières

Les Chenevery

Les Faconnières

Les Genavrières

Les Gruenchers

Les Millandes

Les Ruchots

Les Sorbès

Monts Luisants

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit:

Bas Chenevery

Clos des Ormes

Clos Solon

Corvée Creunille

En la Rue de Vergy

En Seuvrey

La Bidaude

Larrey Froid

Le Village

Les Brâs

Les Champs de la Vigne

Les Cognées

Les Crais

Les Crais-Gillon

Les Herbuottes

Les Larrets

Les Pertuisées

Les Porroux

Les Sionnières

Monts Luisants

Pierre Virant

Rue de Vergy

Très Girard

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$110.00
 
SKU: EMFR07R-22
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