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Type
Red Wine
Domaine Jean Fery Morey St Denis 2012

Domaine Jean Fery Morey St Denis 2012

Appellation
Morey St Denis
Region
Côte de Nuits
Vintage
2012
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$52.00
 
SKU: EFER06R-12
Overview

Morey St Denis is an epicenter. With five Grand Cru and twenty 1er Cru parcels, this is some of the prime real estate in Burgundy. There is hardly an iffy vineyard in the village. And these are some of the most refined wines of the Cotes de Nuits. This village AOC from Domaine Jean Fery has black fruits that impose themselves, sweet and round, in a structure that is typical Morey minerality, with a freshness bred of fine tannins and good balance. Love these 2012s! 

Producer

Domaine Jean Fery

Nestled in the Hautes Cotes village of Echevronne, the Domaine Jean Fery is the master plan of Jean-Louis Fery, the latest in a wine line dating back to the mid-1800s. From 1994, with the help of Alain Meunier of the Domaine Jean-Jacques Confuron, the Domaine Jean Fery went bio (without actually claiming the certification) and started expanding their vineyard holdings. From the 2006 harvest, Pascal Marchand took the reins, continuing the domain's quest for quality and integrity.

Vintage

BURGUNDY 2012 VINTAGE

What a surprise! To say today that the 2012 harvest produced, not just a good Burgundy vintage but an exceptional one, beggars belief.

Here in Burgundy it is often said that June makes the quantity and September makes the quality. And 2012 was a classic example. But because 2012 was such a lousy growing season, and because the wine is just so good, folks are trying to understand why and how that can be.

Here’s how we saw it. It all started well before the sap started to rise in the vines. February was frigid. We had two consecutive weeks where the temperature did not rise above freezing. Our producers tell us that this polar period may have had an important effect on what was to come, notably the poor flowering later in June.Then March was just about all the springtime we had. In fact it was more like summer than summer was. And with those warm dry sunny days, the vines leapt into action. The sap rose and the buds burst well before the end of the month. Everyone was talking about an August harvest! It was, considering what was to come, a glorious time.

Then April brought radical change. A four month period of gloomy cold and wet set in. It rained one day in three until July. And during this time a series of hailstorms shattered the vineyards, especially in the south. The vines flowered in early June, but this was slow and drawn out over the course of the month. Because of this, a lot of the flowering failed. Every incident, it seemed, reduced the potential yield of the crop. Many producers reported as much as 50% crop loss. Some, in the areas worst hit by hail, were almost wiped out.

Then it got warm and the threat of rot turned to reality. Mildew and oidium were rampant. Producers later said that if you were late with copper sulfate treatments in 2012 it was fatal. Then it got hot. And grapes literally grilled on the vine in August, scorched by the heat.

The locals are saying that every month claimed its part of the crop. So the first thing to remember about 2012 is that it is a small harvest, and a very small harvest in certain zones. But what happened next saved the day for what remained on the vine.

Mid-August was hot and sunny, and this continued until well in to of September. The well-watered vines fed what grapes remained, and sugar levels shot up dramatically. It felt like a time of healing. The crop was made up of small clusters of grapes with very thick skins, with lots of space between the berries to allow them to expand and to let air circulate.

So with a healthy albeit small crop on the vines, and what appeared to be stable weather conditions, the producers felt safe that they could wait for ideal maturity. And when harvest began in the latter half of September, the grapes were in good condition. Which is just as well, because halfway through it started to rain and got cold. The worry again was rot. But the thick-skinned grapes were resistant, and the cool temperature kept botrytis at bay.

Those cool final days had another advantage. The fruit was brought to the winery at an ideal temperature to allow a few days of cool maceration before fermentations started, slowly and gently. So from the very start, these wines have shown brilliant color and delicate aromas.

Appellation

MOREY-SAINT DENIS

COTE DE NUITS

Rich in premiers crus and with 5 grands crus, the village should be a household name like its neighbors Gevrey-Chambertin and Chambolle-Musigny. In fact, Morey forms a bridge between these two appellations and shares some climat names. The grands crus form a contiguous band from north to south through the village. Yet despite the fact that Morey produces some of the most consistently excellent wines in Burgundy, fame eludes it outside of the circle of aficionados. This often means that these wines, especially the village and premier cru appellations, can be great value.

The appellation Morey-Saint Denis includes 20 premiers crus and 5 grands crus

Producing commune: Morey-Saint Denis.

Wine

Most of Morey-Saint Denis planted with Pinot Noir, although a few parcels of Chardonnay or Pinot Blanc produce a rare curious white, generally said to be firm and opulent. But Morey is known for its reds, bright ruby or intense garnet, depending on the year. The fruit is black: blackberry and blackcurrant with trademark black cherry fruit and pit. When older it is classic Burgundy Pinot, with animal notes, undergrowth, leather and truffle. Structure and balance are qualities found in all great wine, and Morey is a paradigm. Body, fruit, volume and length are part of the package that Morey climats offer to careful winemakers. The potential for greatness is part of the mystic of the appellation.

Terroirs

The vines grow on limestone and clay-limestone soils dating from the middle jurassic with white bathonien oolite higher on the slopes and fossiliferous bajocien limestone at the foot. The vineyards are east-facing at altitudes of 220-270 meters. Immediately below the village the slopes are differently oriented and the soil has more marl.

Color

Almost all reds - Pinot Noir

White wines - Chardonnay

Production surface area

1 hectare (ha) = 2.4 acres

Reds : 93.03 ha (including 41.92 ha premier cru)

Whites : 3.37 ha (including 0.74 ha premier cru)

Food

The un-PC locals call the reds of Morey-Saint Denis 'masculine', as they are classic examples of full and powerful Cotes de Nuits. So dishes should also be strong and powerful to challenge the tannins and structure of the wine. Often game birds like pheasant are mentioned, as are roasted beef or veal.

On the label, the appellations 'Morey-Saint Denis' and 'Morey-Saint Denis' may be followed by the name of a specific vineyard, known as a climat.

The names of the grands crus are the climats themselves:

Clos de Tart

Bonnes Mares

Clos de la Roche

Clos Saint-Denis

Clos des Lambrays

The following climats are classified as premier cru:

Aux Charmes

Aux Cheseaux

Clos Baulet

Clos des Ormes

Clos Sorbè

Côte Rotie

La Bussière

La Riotte

Le Village

Les Blanchards

Les Chaffots

Les Charrières

Les Chenevery

Les Faconnières

Les Genavrières

Les Gruenchers

Les Millandes

Les Ruchots

Les Sorbès

Monts Luisants

The following climats are village wines from a single vineyard, known as a lieu-dit:

Bas Chenevery

Clos des Ormes

Clos Solon

Corvée Creunille

En la Rue de Vergy

En Seuvrey

La Bidaude

Larrey Froid

Le Village

Les Brâs

Les Champs de la Vigne

Les Cognées

Les Crais

Les Crais-Gillon

Les Herbuottes

Les Larrets

Les Pertuisées

Les Porroux

Les Sionnières

Monts Luisants

Pierre Virant

Rue de Vergy

Très Girard

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